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Design

5 Terrible Web Design Trends That Need To Die

By | Design | No Comments

Working in web design and development in Iowa I get to see a lot of interesting things when it comes to websites that need serious work. A lot of which are just dated websites with dated layouts, and terrible user experiences due to something just outright annoying. So here a few web design trends that need to die.

1: Autoplaying Music & Video

 

Nothing screams “leave this website” like a sound suddenly blasting through your speakers as you begin to load a page. Whenever something like this is asked about, I often recommend that you do not do it. Think of it this way, say it’s very late at night and you’re in bed with your significant other. You can’t sleep so you’re browsing the web on your phone or laptop looking for something. You begin to load a web page and lo and behold you have your volume turned up all the way and suddenly the web page is blasting music or auto-playing a video. You hit the back button faster than the flash but it’s too late, you have woken up aforementioned significant other. If you want media on your site; you should instead give your users the option to play it if they would like. This will keep your bounce rates low and keep you from causing an awkward situation when you’re browsing in a quiet place.

2: Websites Laid Out With Tables

I am actually surprised I still run into these; usually on really old websites or sites that were built on an old platform. Tables are meant to do one thing and one thing only: Organize data! Someone out of their mind decided that they should make it so the tables would have the ability to have an invisible border, and this spawned the to use tables as a tool for layouts. The reason why this is a horrible idea is typically these sites are not mobile-friendly and therefore mobile users are likely to just leave the site. You need to have a website that provides a great experience to mobile users (responsive design should be standard these days). In fact, this is so important that its worth mentioning mobile internet users surpassed desktops. That is very important fact, which brings me onto my next point.

 

3: Websites That Were Designed In Flash

This is another one that is related to mobile but also is as old as dust. It’s worth mentioning that most smartphones these days do not run flash. Not only that but Adobe themselves announced that they will no longer be supporting it. Hence it will become deprecated. The reason being is because modern web technologies like HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript are replacing it. Yes, Flash used to be awesome for displaying cool animations but these days it’s dated and easier to replace with lightweight alternatives. Another painful reality about Flash is the fact that many dated websites are still vulnerable to attack from a security hole Adobe patched years ago. Reason being is these Flash sites are probably still Flash sites because they have yet to be updated.

4: Way Too Many Gifs

 

 

Ok, gifs are awesome when you need to describe what you have to say on social media, and they are really making a comeback. However, a million animated gifs on one page is a terrible idea. Not only does it look horrible, but it distracts the visitors from the main content on the website. Assuming they didn’t smash the back button already. You can already assume that this can hurt the effectiveness of the site. Yes, websites like this do still, unfortunately, exist.

 

 

5: Sites With Separate Mobile Versions

Alright so you guys might burn me at the stake for this but I think we should evolve past having 2 separate websites. Us programmers have a few acronyms for when we do work. Some of them are KISS (Keep it simple stupid), YAGNI (You Ain’t Gonna Need It), and finally, DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself). Why would you have two versions of a website if you could just simply make a single mobile-friendly version? There is no point in developing what is essentially two websites. I consider it to be inefficient and of course, breaks the DRY principle. You are indeed, repeating yourself with two sites.

Overall when you go to make a site you need to keep a few things in mind. User experience, design, and effectiveness. Those are the basics. Not all sites are future proof and many go neglected. Don’t let your site be one of those. Take care of your site with one of our care plans.

 

How Often Should I Redesign My Website

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A mistake a lot of businesses make is that they see a website as one big project and say “Ok we have one! That’s done, whats next?” However, it should be noted that just having a site does not mean it will be stable, maintained, and stylish forever. Which means that you should have it reworked every few years so then you can adapt to the design trends of the future and keep up with modern security standards. In fact, we redesigned our website around four times. This is what the original GearSite website looked like:

 

 

But this is to be expected for an internet marketing company that does web design and development. How often should a regular business (not a web design company) update their site? If you want a quick answer, I would personally say update your site layout and function every 2-3 years. There are so many businesses out there that have websites that have not been updated in five, six, even ten years! This bothers me. It ruins the buying experience for many customers who would like to contact this business through their website, resulting in a high bounce rate. These high bounce rates are particularly present in mobile users because these sites aren’t usually new enough to be mobile friendly. A website that lacks a responsive design would definitely need a redesign to even be remotely up to today’s standards.

Lack of maintenance from web designers kills websites:

There is a point where technology on the server side, which is likely maintained by a system administrator or a team of system administrators, out paces the technology on the website. This causes the code on the site to become deprecated and eventually obsolete. This happens due to the continuous advancement of technology. If you wait long enough, the site will likely fall apart all-together depending on the technology that it’s built upon. A good way to tell if your website has gone stagnant is if it has broken forms, images not showing up, lack of responsive/mobile friendly design, functionality breaking. A stagnant site also increases the risk of viruses.

Proper website function should be tested frequently by your web designer. It should always be noted that websites are never a one-time deal and they should always be maintained. It is also recommended that you have the site backed up by your web host frequently. By doing that, it is possible to revert back to the backup should something happen that results in a site-wide failure.

Good maintenance should keep your site from needing a redesign

Like vehicles and homes, proper maintenance now can reduce the cost later. The lack of maintenance on a website and/or a cultural shift in design are what eventually leads to the requirement for a complete redesign. For example, if your website was built with flash, it is important that you contact a web design agency. Sites built with flash do not work on mobile and are very unappealing to potential customers. Making a site mobile friendly would also require a redesign. However, if you keep in touch with your web designer or agency and request updates when necessary, a full on redesign should almost never be necessary.

Why web design is important

We live in a digital age and a consumer’s trust is critical to lead generation on a website. That’s why a modern and functional design that has a good user experience is critical to online success. You don’t want the business of your customers to be turned away to a competitor because they represented their company better than you did. An appealing design coupled with excellent SEO creates a nearly unstoppable online presence that actively works to present your business in the best possible light.

 

In short, you would want your website to be reworked every two to three years. You could reduce the expense by having your web designer or web design agency do maintenance involves modernization over the months. This should help with the price when it comes to a major overhaul which your site will likely need down the road.

Where to Get Free to Use Media

By | Business, Design, Marketing | No Comments

A challenge many businesses face is finding media that they can use for free. It’s good to understand that you can’t just grab images off of Google. The reason being is because copyright laws and Licensing can get in the way, along with possibly get you in trouble. So I’m going to be writing this article telling you where you can find free to use images that you don’t need a to attribute credit to (CC0). Even images that you’re allowed to use commercially, and if you wanted to you could modify the images as well. Not only will I tell you where to find images, but I’ll also tell you where you can find things like icons and videos that you can use on your website or other media like print and social.

Free to Use Images:

Pixabay:


Pixabay is my go-to website when it comes down to free to use images that I do not need to attribute for. They have a very large selection of images on the web that photographers around the world contribute to. Not only that but they also have several vector graphics on there as well help convey a message to your customers. You can freely use modify and distribute these images. The only stipulation is that if an identifiable person is placed in a bad light or in a way that people may find offensive you cannot do that unless they give their consent. Meaning you cannot use them for something pornographic, unlawful, or immoral. Pixabay is an amazing resource when it comes to free to use images. I encourage donating to the authors whose images that you download the most. You can do this by clicking the coffee button under the profile picture of the author when viewing an image.

Pexels:


Pexels is another great website that has free to use images that have optional attribution. Pexels of course also says that the pictures are free for personal and even commercial use. The restrictions again are similar to that of Pixabay where you cannot represent the person that may be identifiable in the image in a bad light. They even encourage you to contribute your own images if they are high quality. You also have the option to donate to them which supports free to use images on the web. The button is at the bottom of their about us page.

Unsplash:


Unsplash is another website that you can use to download even more free to use images. According to their Manifesto, the concept was born from the pain that they as the creators had in finding great usable imagery. Just from looking through their library I can tell you that a lot of the images that they offer are high-resolution meaning that they’re very good quality. And like Pixabay and Pexels they offer a Creative Commons Zero license.

What you can’t do with any of these images:

You cannot portray recognizable people in photos in a bad light without their permission. If there are any trademarks, logos, brands, or anything else related to a different company depicted in the images (Like a Coca-Cola sign), that does not mean you could suddenly go about using that company’s logo. You will first need to ask for permission from the company.

Videos:

Pexels Videos:


This is another awesome place for you to find videos that you might need for your website or blog. If you’re just stitching a video together and you need some sort of HD stock footage or you’re looking for something to be a buffer between your different scenes Pexels Videos might be the place for you. This is actually where we got the video background for our homepage. The videos have the same rules as the pictures stated above and are also under a CC0 license.

Pixabay Video Filter:

free to use video by pixabay
If you go to Pixabay’s website and you look at their search bar you’ll see that they have a video filter. You could use this video filter to find other free to use CC0 videos. Those of course, with the same rules that I mentioned above, do not require attribution. Also, like Pexels, Pixabay provides HD video that you can use for your projects.

Icon Fonts:

Icon fonts are typically used by web developers and designers to give websites and web apps a better user experience. Could you imagine a world without icons?

Font Awesome:

font awesome - free to use icon fonts

Font awesome is a massive icon pack along with a web designers best friend. We use them quite often for many of the websites that we design along with web applications that we develop. What an icon is able to do is provide a better user experience along with conveying a message better.

Fontello:

fontello - free to use icon fonts
Fontello has a huge collection of icons on their website that could be integrated into your site or a web app. They give you the ability to choose whichever one that you want along with download your selection. Fontello does not also require attribution.

Why does it matter if media is “free to use”?:

It is technically stealing if you go to Google images and download an image that you end up using for a commercial purpose. This is called piracy. The reason why it’s illegal is that the original artist who created the image did not give you permission to go and take it off of whatever resource you took it from. That’s because the author is the original copyright holder even if there is no copyright symbol on the image. When you visit these different websites that I talked about the media that they offer is free to use on your own site. With attribution being recommended but not required. Using these sites keeps you away from hefty copyright fines that can cripple most small businesses. Decreasing risk and liability significantly, that’s why it matters. You can learn more about the CC0 license here.

How do we use These Resources?:

As a web solution company, these resources offer savings that get passed down to the customers who would no longer have to purchase images or other forms of content. These sites are often used for our web design service and you can find many traces of us using these resources on our own site (Reverse image search). By using Google Images.

Good Use of Image

It’s All About Image

By | Design | No Comments

Everyone can appreciate a good image. Supposedly an image can speak a thousand words. I disagree. I think that images are better used with words. As developers, its easy to see how an image can be used to make a clearer point, or to add extra flair to a web page.

Proper Image Context

Being selective with images is key. You never want to use an image out of context. In other words, you wouldn’t use a picture of the Mona Lisa when discussing the differences in dog food brands, just because you think the Mona Lisa is pretty. It’s okay to get picky when deciding on images for a site. You want to find an image that properly conveys your purpose. Take GearSite for example. We used plenty of pictures in our site, but we made sure they all made sense in context. We mainly used pictures that show our design process, our staff, and our location. These all help to better illustrate our points. Using images related to your business or topic of conversation are crucial to an exceptional site.

File Size

Balancing quality and load time is also important when selecting an image. We all know that the higher quality an image is, the better it will look, especially when displayed on larger devices. But you have to offset that quality with file size. Making file sizes to large can cause several problems. Using large images can slow down your load speeds, making it annoying or frustrating for your customers. Large load times can turn customers away from your site, costing you sales. The larger the file sizes the more space your site takes up on a server. The last thing a system administrator needs to deal with is a lack of space and the last thing you want is to be griped at by said administrator.

Images are incredibly important, especially in websites. A visual can help convey a complicated topic, or it can serve to make your site a little more decorated. Either way, selecting the proper images, and balancing the quality with the file size are integral for building and maintaining a successful, and profitable site.