All Posts By

Cole Troester

Google My Business

Getting your Business on Google

By | Business, Marketing

Everyone knows Google, everyone loves it. It’s the world’s favorite search engine. You can tell because I don’t even have to source that, because it’s common knowledge! And if there’s one thing that Google is good at, it’s business. People who search for your business are going to be searching for it on Google. So it’s up to you to make sure your information is readily available when they search.

Google: My Business

Google My Business offers a great way to offer your information to customers. With My Business, you can choose the information your potential customers see when they look up your business. Verifying your  information with Google makes you seem more trustworthy as a business. You can also set your hours and address so customers can find out where you are and choose just when to drop by. Using My Business also allows you to put other information out to potential customers, such as a phone number and your website. If a customer were to leave a reply or rating, you could respond to it any clear up any questions anyone may have. It is also possible to post pictures of your business, which also make potential customers much more likely to stop by. You can see the demographics, such as location, of the users searching for your site, and how they searched for it. Oh, and did I mention, it’s free.

Using Google My Business is sort of like free SEO. You’d have to be crazy not to take advantage of it. With this tool you can decide how your business is represented on the largest and most popular search engine. That really means something. As a business owner, any way to better promote your business and interact with your customers is beneficial. Make sure you’re taking advantage of anything that can get you a leg up.

Good Use of Image

It’s All About Image

By | Design | No Comments

Everyone can appreciate a good image. Supposedly an image can speak a thousand words. I disagree. I think that images are better used with words. As developers, its easy to see how an image can be used to make a clearer point, or to add extra flair to a web page.

Proper Image Context

Being selective with images is key. You never want to use an image out of context. In other words, you wouldn’t use a picture of the Mona Lisa when discussing the differences in dog food brands, just because you think the Mona Lisa is pretty. It’s okay to get picky when deciding on images for a site. You want to find an image that properly conveys your purpose. Take GearSite for example. We used plenty of pictures in our site, but we made sure they all made sense in context. We mainly used pictures that show our design process, our staff, and our location. These all help to better illustrate our points. Using images related to your business or topic of conversation are crucial to an exceptional site.

File Size

Balancing quality and load time is also important when selecting an image. We all know that the higher quality an image is, the better it will look, especially when displayed on larger devices. But you have to offset that quality with file size. Making file sizes to large can cause several problems. Using large images can slow down your load speeds, making it annoying or frustrating for your customers. Large load times can turn customers away from your site, costing you sales. The larger the file sizes the more space your site takes up on a server. The last thing a system administrator needs to deal with is a lack of space and the last thing you want is to be griped at by said administrator.

Images are incredibly important, especially in websites. A visual can help convey a complicated topic, or it can serve to make your site a little more decorated. Either way, selecting the proper images, and balancing the quality with the file size are integral for building and maintaining a successful, and profitable site.

Friendly and Happy Coworkers

Team Cohesion and Happy Employees

By | Business | No Comments

We can probably all agree that getting along with your employees and/or your coworkers is a good thing. Happy workers tend to be more productive, and more productive workers means more money for everyone. Having a staff that gets along is imperative for any business, but that’s only the beginning. A company should be welcoming and friendly, while remaining professional and productive.

We all like to have a bit of separation between our personal life and our work life. However, that doesn’t mean that they cant bleed a little bit into each other. It has been proven that employees who were more engaged with their coworkers were happier than their less engaged counterparts (Davis 2017). As an employer, it is important to provide positive feedback to your employees. Remember to socialize with them, so they see you as a leader, rather than someone they are in opposition against. Being able to feel comfortable around fellow coworkers is important to the well-being of any employee.

There is a limit to these interactions, however. As coworkers become friends, they begin to find common interests and share with one another more and more. This office “gossip” and “chit-chat” can be unproductive, and productivity is vital to any business. As an employer, setting specific times, such as lunch hour, can give your employees the time they need to socialize. Note that by forcing employees to completely cut off non-essential communication, their engagement with others is lowered and they can become unhappy and unsatisfied with their jobs. Everyone needs a break sometimes. As an employee, you can work to keep conversations with colleagues, during working hours, brief, possibly using them as a sort of reward for a completion of a task.

A social employee is a happy employee, and a happy employee is a productive employee. Remember to allow your employees to socialize and join in on the conversations. Talk to your coworkers and get to know them, you may have more in common than you think.

 

Sources:

Davis, Sadie “Increasing Happiness in the Workplace,” The Kabod 3. 3 (2017) Article 3. Liberty University Digital Commons. Web. [19 May 2017].